Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Beans On A Branch

We've been experimenting with growing edamame (defined as "a dish of green soybeans boiled or steamed in their pods") for several years. For the uninitiated, I'll share the correction pronunciation: "ed-ah-mah-may."
Edamame soybeans are different varieties than the those grown to make tofu, soybean oil or other soy products. They're are harvested while they're still green, before the pods dry, much like fresh peas.
Edamame are loaded with nutrition and packed with fiber. One cup provides 34 percent of daily protein needs while boasting exceptionally high folate, manganese and Vitamin K levels. They also offer a source of iron, magnesium, thiamin, phosphorous, potassium, copper., calcium and Vitamin C according to my sources.
We'll be growing edamame again in 2014 and already folks who have been our edamame customers in the past have placed orders for this summer. 
American farmers lead the world in soybean production, growing 75 million acres in 2011. But production of the “vegetable soybean,” called edamame, lags far behind Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, and Thailand. - See more at: http://www.non-gmoreport.com/articles/april2012/edamame-non-gmo-us-farmers.php#sthash.iApL1HBR.dpuf
My mother (who has had a hand in shelling a lot of edamame destined for the freezer here on Crandall Hill) saw a piece about an upsurge in commercial edamame production in Arkansas (where my brother and sister-in-law, also with edamame shelling practice, make their home) on CBS News this morning. NPR ran this piece ( http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/10/16/234764120/arkansas-aims-to-make-edamame-as-american-as-apple-pie ) in October.
If you'd like to try fresh edamame next summer and want to assure that we'll grow enough for you, please email, comment or telephone us to get your name on our list. (See previous blog post http://www.metzgerfarm.blogspot.com/2014/01/whats-on-horizon.html .)

American farmers lead the world in soybean production, growing 75 million acres in 2011. But production of the “vegetable soybean,” called edamame, lags far behind Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, and Thailand. - See more at: http://www.non-gmoreport.com/articles/april2012/edamame-non-gmo-us-farmers.php#sthash.iApL1HBR.dpuf
American farmers lead the world in soybean production, growing 75 million acres in 2011. But production of the “vegetable soybean,” called edamame, lags far behind Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, and Thailand. - See more at: http://www.non-gmoreport.com/articles/april2012/edamame-non-gmo-us-farmers.php#sthash.iApL1HBR.dpuf
American farmers lead the world in soybean production, growing 75 million acres in 2011. But production of the “vegetable soybean,” called edamame, lags far behind Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, and Thailand. - See more at: http://www.non-gmoreport.com/articles/april2012/edamame-non-gmo-us-farmers.php#sthash.iApL1HBR.dpuf


American farmers lead the world in soybean production, growing 75 million acres in 2011. But production of the “vegetable soybean,” called edamame, lags far behind Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, and Thailand. - See more at: http://www.non-gmoreport.com/articles/april2012/edamame-non-gmo-us-farmers.php#sthash.iApL1HBR.dpuf

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